Sunday, December 7, 2014

New Stuff

Reading the notice from Goodwin Forest, I thought, Well, I should be around to do that as long as the weather is good.  So on Thursday I headed over to Goodwin State Forest for a short hike on the yellow and white trail with a few other devout walkers.

Although I haven't seen the folks at Goodwin in a long while, it seemed I never left.  I really wish that my other activities didn't conflict with programs I want to attend.  Today though the guided hike fit right in the time slot.  


Walking through the Norway pines growing on the ridge near the towering White pines, Emma, the center's program director, stopped suddenly and stooped to pick up a piece of brown, dry pine straw lying on the ground and a nearby bough.  Then pointing out some Red pines nearby, she referred to the clump of pine needles and said, "A simple way to determine if you have a cluster of White Pine is simple.  Although difficult to see in the pic below, there are five needles per fascicle.  So just remember five means W...H...I...T...E."  The word "white" has five letters just like the pine needle fascicle!




 For general Tree Identification, this is a great source...Exploring Nature.
Did I ever tell you I took Botany in College and loved it?


Did you know that foresters no longer cut down the dead pines?

They are a valuable resource to all sorts of burrowing animals, birds and insects so they are now spared.

Proven to be invaluable to a myriad of critters, they provide nesting, roosting, storage and feeding to many.  Forest Management remains in tune with ecological needs, treating them with the utmost respect.


Do you know what the symbol means on this tree?

If you don't, don't feel bad.

I had no clue!

I was told the two horizontal lines mean:

The end of the Yellow & White Trail

But I'm always open to learn something new and it seems that every excursion I go on, I do!

When was the last time you followed a trail through the forest?

Sharing my new stuff with you and those at 



19 comments:

Beatrice P. Boyd said...

It has been awhuke since I have taken a forest walk. Sadly, there are none closeby to our home here on the VA eastern shore. But, when we lived in NJ, a favorite place was Double Trouble Park, which was only a short drive away. We walked it during fall and winter several times a month. Thanks for the info on tree ID.

Sandra said...

3 years since i followed a trail.. i love that dead tree... and glad they are leaving them, that is a great idea. wish i had had that site back when i was struggling to identify our two pines the back yard... thanks for the link

Sandra said...

the link is a PDF file, is that what it should be?

Empty Nester said...

Tuck and I go on the nature trail every weekend and it goes through a small forest and ends up at the marsh. I always envision native Americans when we walk through the mostly pine woods and often wonder what tales these woods could/would tell. There's no guided tour as the trail is not that long. But I share your enthusiasm for walking these types of trails. I'm glad to know about the dead pines. Now I know why there are so many still standing around the trail. :)

eileeninmd said...

Great post, JP! Hubby and I always enjoy a hike thru a forest.. Esepecially a pine forest.. Happy Sunday!

Delores said...

It was a long time ago but I remember feeling like I was in church.

TexWisGirl said...

nice to have a guided hike!

Inger said...

Interesting to learn about the dead trees. Mother nature takes care of herself and nothing goes to waste. I follow coyote trails here, no forest, just around the land. They are also very interesting, those trails.

Monkeywrangler said...

If they don't remove the dead trees, do they allow for small fires to burn properly through the first e? Otherwise they simply cause a huge build-up of fuel and eventually you get a devastating monster fire.

Florida Farm Girl said...

Too long ago!!! I miss my rambles through the forest in Florida. Haven't found a wandering buddy yet up here. Doesn't it just fill your heart with gladness to be out there?

Ginny said...

What a beautiful and educational walk that must have been! I did not know about not cutting the dead trees anymore. That is a good thing. Around here they have to be cut, or they could fall on a house! Your last picture is stunning, and my favorite!

Country Wife said...

Beautiful pictures thanks for sharing.

Pamela Gordon said...

Thanks for that tip on identifying a white pine tree! So cool. I haven't hiked on a trail that had markers since last year. Have a good week!

Ginny said...

Testing to see if my comment got lost...

Ginny said...

I did not know they are not cutting down the trees, that is a good idea. Of course in the city we can't do that because they could fall on a house. Your last picture is stunning, the hike must have been beautiful.

Barb said...

Following forest trails is one of my favorite pastimes.

Ann Thompson said...

It's been several years since I stopped at a nature center and walked their trails. I thought I was going to be eaten alive by all the bugs

Lisa @ Two Bears Farm said...

I have not seen symbols like that on the trails around here.

Ida said...

What a fun walk that must have been. And now I've learned some things I didn't know, which was also fun.

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